Oliver Jeffers and His Dipped Painting Project

Maybe you’ve heard of Oliver Jeffers or own one of his beautifully-illustrated children’s books. (We have this and this.) I’m a big fan–and apparently so is my girl crush!  I recently saw that he’s started a rather interesting painting project:

Essentially, the guy’s been spending loads of time painting really incredible portraits and as a series of performance pieces, he’ll be dipping them into vats of enamel paint, covering most of the work he’s spent hours upon hours to create. The people in the paintings were interviewed by Jeffers about their experiences with loss and how their memories affect their identity. He’s transcribed their stories onto paper, with each sheet sitting beneath the painting to catch all the drippings, thus hiding the written interviews as well.

From the NY Times:

“Jeffers created portraits from his memories of those interviews, which were hidden from the public until the moment of their dipping, after which witnesses were interviewed about what they saw (some immediately after; others will be interviewed in the coming months). ‘The only evidence of this painting will be people who witness it, like history,’ he said. Eventually, all the works and their materials — including the drop cloths, inscribed with Jeffers’ memories of the interviews, over which the paintings dried — will be displayed in an installation.”

So fascinating.

It’s like a game of memory that challenges you to participate in art and really pay attention to details. It’s got me thinking, as a storyteller, what do I need to share with others that I want them to know? And what do I need to ask others in my life so that their story can live on, be seen and felt and heard and passed along?

Really compelling, right? Are you following any incredible artists on Instagram?  

All photos via Oliver Jeffers.

 

P.S. Check out his website for cool free illustrations for coloring, crafting, and puzzles. Also, more awesome art.

What I’m Reading: An Interview with Sophia Amoruso

Sophia Amoruso Refinery 29 interview GIRLBOSS Nasty Gal Vintage founder
Need some motivation on this fine Monday?  Check out this interview with the founder (and “chief troublemaker”) of Nasty Gal Vintage, Sophia Amoruso. This quote really caught my attention:

My dad said at dinner the other night something that I really loved — he said, ‘Hope is not a strategy,’ which is so true. The best things happen with not only hope, but ingenuity, self-awareness, and a lot of elbow grease. That’s when the real magic happens.

Her book #GIRLBOSS comes out tomorrow. Looks like a fun read!

Have you read anything inspiring lately? 

 

Do You Have a Collection?

As a kid, I had a rock collection. Whenever our family would go on vacations, I’d always check out the gift shop, picking out a piece of quartz or soapstone or obsidian, or maybe an arrowhead. I kept them in a wooden box with my name on it (hand painted with wooden letters) and I’d proudly pull it out of my desk drawer, open it up and marvel at my precious picks when friends came over. They probably couldn’t care less.

curio collector's box anthropologie

So, what is it with collecting stuff? I found this interesting article about why creatives tend to collect stuff and it turns out there’s actually some psychology behind it. Did you know that Tom Hanks collects vintage typewriters? How cool!

Mumbles and I buy Christmas ornaments whenever we go on trips, but I am usually less than enthused with my options and oftentimes must resort to a key chain that I later disassemble to turn into a suitable ornament. So now I’m thinking I definitely need to start a new rock collection…

What about you? Do you collect anything?
P.S. Isn’t it fascinating that the article also points out how some people use Pinterest to “digitally collect” things? Oh, and speaking of geology, here’s how Mumbles and I met.

 

[image via Anthropologie — isn’t it gorgeous?!!]

What I’m Reading: Sarah Lacey’s Post About “Having It All”

I’ve been reading this article (found via) a few times over, as it’s been floating around Facebook and blogs this week, and I think it’s an important one for women to read. I still can’t wrap my head around it because as women, we often get caught up in juggling and multitasking and “having it all.” And, in fact, I think we try to do it all so well that a lot of the time, having it all seems really unattainable. Or, we lose sight of what of “it all” is really important to us as individuals instead of what the world thinks we should be focused on.

Lucky for me, I have a spectrum of interesting, intelligent, brave, strong, funny, beautiful, caring women in my life who are inspiring in the way they lead their own lives, full of unending support and encouragement, and each of them helps light a path toward my own happiness. Here’s to having it all (and having fun trying)!

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P.S. Now I really want to read Sheryl Sandberg’s new book Lean In.