Instagram Inspiration

Some things I’m loving right now…

Stunning invitations by Anne Robin and hand lettering by Jenny Highsmith of Maiedae that really make me want to learn calligraphy…

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Sweet Stuff: May Link Roundup

21 of Maya Angelou’s best quotes, and one of my favorites:

 “My great hope is to laugh as much as I cry; to get my work done and try to love somebody and have the courage to accept the love in return.”

How having a child expands your world.

Two college students anonymously “vandalize” school chalkboards with incredible illustrations every week. Check out their Etsy shop for prints and Behance for detailed shots. What talent!

Just bought my first pair of TOMS. I’m so late to that party but when I couldn’t stop thinking about these beauties and they sold out, I needed to fill the void in my closet immediately.

Daydreaming about spending my December birthday in Hawaii. With lots of friends. So we can afford to rent the Dolphin House.

The right way to apply bright lipstick.

Recline, don’t ‘Lean In’ — this woman says we need to fight for our right to lean back and put our feet up! (More on that here, here and here.)

If you’re in OC, check out the grand opening of the Anaheim Packing District this weekend. I’ve been hearing about this since my intern days working at the City of Anaheim — can’t wait to check out all the new eateries! There’s even an outdoor eating amphitheater – perfect for summer picnics!

This hat (below) for lounging poolside and lazy days on the lake.

lauren conrad in anthro hat

 

[image via Lauren Conrad]

What I’m Reading: An Interview with Sophia Amoruso

Sophia Amoruso Refinery 29 interview GIRLBOSS Nasty Gal Vintage founder
Need some motivation on this fine Monday?  Check out this interview with the founder (and “chief troublemaker”) of Nasty Gal Vintage, Sophia Amoruso. This quote really caught my attention:

My dad said at dinner the other night something that I really loved — he said, ‘Hope is not a strategy,’ which is so true. The best things happen with not only hope, but ingenuity, self-awareness, and a lot of elbow grease. That’s when the real magic happens.

Her book #GIRLBOSS comes out tomorrow. Looks like a fun read!

Have you read anything inspiring lately? 

 

The Year of 3

Today Mumbles and I celebrate our third wedding anniversary! I don’t know if we still qualify as newlyweds but the joy, bliss, love and happiness in our partnership astonishes me in the new ways it continues to grow.

“He is more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine our the same.” –Emily Brontë

We’ve been together nine years now and in this third year of our marriage we will become a family of three (humans…Baxter makes four). We have so much to be grateful for, especially our family and friends who constantly fill us with laughter, support, encouragement and inspiration. Thank you.

Cheers to three years, Mumbles, and to many, many more!

wedding party

 

 

[photo: Brandon Kidd Photography]

Good Reads: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
(original cover)

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is one of my all-time favorite books. A little treasure of a book, it was given to me by a dear friend in high school (which feels like the perfect time to read it because Charlie is struggling and finding his way through life in high school) and since then, I’ve probably read it a dozen times.  And I’ve shared it probably with just as many people. It’s a book that changes you, changes your perspective, makes you think, makes you sad, causes you to create silence in your life to look at the things around you and inside you, and try to understand it all. I think it’s easy to say that I take something new away from each time I read it, a new perspective or the same one, affected differently but deeply, and I think that’s probably true for most people who read it.

I found the review below on Amazon.com and wanted to share it because it reads less like a review and more like a friend pulling the tattered book out of their bag and setting it on a table in front of you — pages bent and certain paragraphs or quotes highlighted (or maybe like mine, the poem page earmarked because I’ve gone back to it so many times) — and sincerely telling you why you need to read it, what it’s about and how it’s relatable (which should be how all reviews read), just begging for you to read it and absorb it so you can connect, congratulate and commiserate together after you finish it. I wanted to share this particular review because I think even in the way people describe this beloved book, there’s a lot to learn in that.  I can imagine this being a book club selection and discussing it for months, and dear goodness, the things we might know of our friends if we truly talked and shared and listened after reading this book and dissecting its sadness.

I can’t find my copy of The Perks of Being a Wallflower now – surely it’s with someone I gave it to or someone they gave it to, or perhaps it’s found its way to a used bookstore for someone else to discover my underlines and bent pages – that’s the magic in books, right?

Have you read The Perks of Being a Wallflower?  I’d love to know your thoughts about it.


“I read The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky, in April of my sophomore year at college. A friend lent it to me and I had read it within twelve hours. This book reaches inside of you and pulls everything to the surface. It is a beautiful and painful story about a 15 year old boy, Charlie, moving through his freshmen year of highschool. It is written in letter form to an unknown friend. Charlie is always completely honest, whether he is describing his first “beer” party where he witnessed a girl being raped by her boyfriend, or explaining masturbation and his excitement for this newfound “activity.” Charlie is a wallflower who observes people and feels very deeply for the experiences occuring around him. His favorite Aunt Helen died in a car accident when he was six, and he holds himself accountable, and his best friend committed suicide a year before he began the letters. His English teacher realizes Charlie’s potential and brilliance and asks him to try and participate, which Charlie agrees to do. He becomes friends with two seniors Patrick and Samantha and begins to experience dances, parties, the Rocky Horror Picture Show, pot, love, bad trips and sexuality. We feel exhilerated when Charlie describes his happy moments, and we are swallowed in pain when Charlie is overwhelmed by his depression. Charlie’s realizations are eye opening for us, and we are so captivated and immersed in his life that his life and stories become a very real experience. This book is about moments, and being as much alive within each moment as possible. It is about looking around us at the world and the people and appreciating that we don’t know what their lives are like, and the pain and happiness that they experience day to day, so we shouldn’t judge them but accept them and appreciate them. A favorite section of this book, for me, was when Charlie describes the movie It’s A Wonderful Life, and how he wished the movie had been about one of the less heroic characters so the audience could have seen the meaning that this person’s life held. That moment is just one example of Charlie’s amazing intuition. This book should not be limited to a certain “category” of people. I truly believe that it would be understood, appreciated, and loved by everyone aged 12 (+ or – a few) and up regardless of gender, race, sexuality, etc. This book changes you, if only for a moment, but you are not the same upon completion, and you become more appreciative of life than ever.” – Emily, Amazon.com

P.S. Don’t get the book with the movie promotion cover.  That’s stupid. I hate movie poster books. I haven’t seen the movie – I want to and I will – but please don’t be unawesome. Get the original cover book, read it, then go see the movie.  You’re welcome.

P.S. 2 Here’s an article that the author of the book/director of the movie, Stephen Chbosky, did for the Washington Post.

P.S. 3 If anyone wants to buy me this card of a quote from the book and mail it to me so I can frame it, that’d be great. Thanks.

card by SparrowNestScript on Etsy